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The Lizard And The Tower Climber

If you meet a tower climber, you may want to thank him or her for our cellular service, wi-fi, & more! My lizard knows one and thanks him often, not for what he does, but for who he is!

Lil’ Murph gets excited when the tower climber comes to visit!

mde
“Oh boy, oh boy, yay!!”

So here’s Murph waiting to see him…mde…and waiting

mdemde

sdr

This is a day in the life of a tower climber:

It’s that windy up there on a seemingly calm day!

 

1017160_665670146809222_958643487_nApparently, the lizard’s tower climber has always had crazy upper body strength!

The moment Murph’s been waiting for…

dav
“Aaah….finally!!”

…and he couldn’t keep his little eyes open!

Lizards….

they love their people!

 

“Give me Lizardry or give me Death!” – ♥ Dawn Renee

 

Lizard Facts

Do Lizards Have 20/20 Vision?

I think it would be interesting to see the world as every other creature does, if only for a fleeting moment!     So what do lizards see?

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Well…. Lizard (including geckos) and turtle retinas contain multicolored oil droplets in their photoreceptors, so   they can perceive color.    The opsin proteins in the cones in the eye are “calibrated” to detect different wavelengths. In many species, this enables them to see into the higher wavelengths beyond the scope of unaided human vision: into the UV range.

Nocturnal reptiles usually have smaller eyes than diurnal ones, but relatively large pupillary and lens aperture and cornea. This improves their light-gathering ability, but at the same time reduces visual acuity.

Lizards can focus on near and far by squeezing or stretching their lenses, using the ciliary muscles and annular pads. Pupils dilate and contract in response to light. Nocturnal geckos like the tokay have a stenopaic pupil: contracts into a vertical slit composed of a linear array of dots. Some nocturnal lizards have slit pupils, others are round. Lizards, unlike other reptiles, have a choroid body, called the conus papillaris. Projecting out into the vitrious humor, it nourishes the cornea.

*Thank you    http://www.anapsid.org/sight.html

The spectrum of sunlight includes infrared, “visible light” (the colors we see in the rainbow) and ultraviolet light, which is subdivided into UVA, UVB and UVC.

UVA, is essential. Many reptiles have extremely good color vision. Humans have three types of retinal cone cells for color vision, and their brains combine the information from these cells and perceive the blend as a certain color. Most reptiles, however, have a fourth cone type, which responds to UVA. These reptiles see a much more colorful rainbow than humans do, which makes providing natural lighting quite a challenge. This extra color perception is especially important to many reptile species in recognizing others of their species and even food items.

Some nocturnal geckos lack the red-sensitive cone, but their green-sensitive cone also responds to red light; they can certainly see it. Studies have even shown that some use their cone types for color vision in light similar to dim moonlight. Thus it is possible that “moonlight blue” or “red night light” lamps, which usually are much brighter than moonlight, alter these animals’ view of the twilight world.lighting-2-500

Sunlight also has effects unrelated to conscious vision. A reptile’s eyes, and the parietal eye (third eye) in those species that have one, transmit information to other parts of its brain responsible for setting circadian (daily) and circannual (yearly) rhythms. There are even light-sensitive areas of the reptilian brain that respond directly to sunlight’s glow through the skull. The length of day and night, the sun’s position in the sky, and the intensity and amount of blue in sunlight all give precise information about the time of day and season of the year. In response, a reptile adjusts its activity levels, and daily and seasonal behaviors, such as its reproductive cycle and thermoregulation needs. Even nocturnal species govern their behavior by monitoring day and night from their daytime hiding places.

*Thank you   http://www.reptilesmagazine.com/Reptile-Health/Habitats-Care/Reptile-Lighting-Information/

…So what have we learned if the study and testing conclusions are accurate?

  1. Lizards do see colors.
  2. Most reptiles actually see a much more colorful rainbow than we!
  3. Most lizards have a parietal eye, known as the third eye, which is a photosensory organ.
  4. Also, their pupils dilate and contract, same as ours, to focus on things near or further away.
  5. I will further add to this by stating a lizard (specifically Bearded Dragons) close their eyes for 4 reasons:     a) You are overstimulating at the moment OR they don’t like you AND they want you to go away.    b) They are sleepy.    c) They are at this very moment, in perfect peace with their environment & existence.      d) They are feeling love from or toward you right now.
    dav
    “Yes, I can see very well with my cute eyes!”
    img_20191026_141532.jpg
    “I see Mommy has a lighting obsession.”
    mde
    “I see brother Dog is…being dogly.”

     

    20190818_203316.jpg
    “Mommy wonders how I see this double rainbow.”
    “Give me Lizardry or give me Death!” – ♥Dawn Renee
videos

Jingle All The Way

You’ll want to increase your volume to enjoy his jingle, then decrease it when he pauses because there’s baby-talk happening here… It’s private between Murph & myself.

Lil’ Murph was getting his smoothie treat, he likes to eat on the run. Yes, this is ridiculous. Yes, I must find a solution to the strictly smoothie diet he insists upon. Finally, no, this is not normal lizard behavior (it’s been like this since he got depressed from my leaving him for 2 weeks, I was at a beautiful beach without him).

This video has been paused & restarted within the recording process in my attempt to capture the best jingling episodes. This is what we have for now.

When I’m working around the house, cleaning or completing a project of some kind, Murph often gets to explore the room I’m in. I create somewhat of a large playpen so he can safely walk & climb for exercise by blocking certain entrances & nooks behind furniture.

We recently moved to a different home, so… I’m going to state: No, I don’t like brown on walls, especially not the interesting hues of, how do I put this, diarrhea, that was selected by the previous owners. I will not carry on about the poor craftsmanship found more often than not, or the expensive tile floor having been installed incorrectly. Only 1 – 3 projects can be done at a time, ya know. : )

However, Murph likes the new home now. It has ‘good bones’ & is located in a neat area. There’s neat spots in & around it & Lil’ Murph enjoys climbing up & sliding down the steps to the sunken entry.

Murph can think more clearly too since all that wallpaper with mauve flowers is no more!

We hope you’ve enjoyed the Murphness of this video.

 

“Give me Lizardry or give me Death!” -♥Dawn Renee